looking for a road bike.

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looking for a road bike.

Postby barry1me » June 10th, 2013, 11:03 am

Guys Im throwing the idea around about getting a road bike for the days when MTBing is not possible. I dont know much about MTB bikes, and I know nothing about road bikes. In the past I have mostly purchased road bikes but im open to whatever. Anyone have any suggestions on brands/models, and what to look for?
Last edited by barry1me on June 10th, 2013, 12:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: looking for a road bike, never owned one

Postby iamkickstand » June 10th, 2013, 11:12 am

so you never owned one, or did own one? :?:
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Re: looking for a road bike, never owned one

Postby barry1me » June 10th, 2013, 12:46 pm

iamkickstand wrote:so you never owned one, or did own one? :?:


lol im a ratard sometimes.....I have never owned any road bikes.
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Re: looking for a road bike.

Postby iamkickstand » June 10th, 2013, 1:04 pm

lol no worries.

good luck on your search, I think I am on the same hunt, but i am going to try and buy a cheap used one.
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Re: looking for a road bike.

Postby barry1me » June 10th, 2013, 1:30 pm

iamkickstand wrote:lol no worries.

good luck on your search, I think I am on the same hunt, but i am going to try and buy a cheap used one.


im up for cheap and used also...let me know what you find also.
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Re: looking for a road bike.

Postby jmf003 » June 10th, 2013, 1:41 pm

iamkickstand wrote:lol no worries.

good luck on your search, I think I am on the same hunt, but i am going to try and buy a cheap used one.


That was going to be my suggestion: cheap and used is the way to go for a first road bicycle. Might as well try it out without committing a lot of money up front. If you find yourself enjoying the road you can always resell the cheap/used bicycle and put the money toward a more expensive/newer/better one.

Drop bars give you more hand position options but some folks (e.g. my wife) prefer flat bars. A true road frame will probably be limited to very skinny tires, e.g. 25 mm or less. A CX frame or a hybrid frame will usually support wider tires, up to 45mm or so. If you wind up riding gravel roads or badly broken asphalt the extra tire diameter can be helpful. If you look at hybrids, I'd avoid ones with suspension forks because of the additional weight.

Stick with brand names that you recognize and avoid discount store bicycles, which tend to have heavy and soft frames.
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Re: looking for a road bike.

Postby mtbcrasher » June 10th, 2013, 2:51 pm

How much do you want to spend, I just purchased a Scott CR1 Team, carbon frame, shimano 105 components, really nice bike, I picked mine up for about $2100. and got 12 months same as cash. Check it out
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Re: looking for a road bike.

Postby MediumRB » June 10th, 2013, 3:02 pm

Try to get something with Shimano 105 level components (or SRAM) so you do not get frustrated with a low quality road bike experience. If you can get late 1990 steel or more recent aluminum with a carbon fork, you will be starting at a good place and reasonable prices. Something like a Cannondale R800 can be had for less than $500, or a Specialized Allez, etc. Bikesdirect.com has easy options, too.
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Re: looking for a road bike.

Postby shopsonian » June 10th, 2013, 7:14 pm

I've been a 20 yr mountain biker and started riding road bikes about 3 years ago.

I started with a used Specialized Allez, aluminum with Shimano 105 components. This was a great first bike. Then I decided to upgrade to a full carbon, Cervelo with Sram Rival. The carbon Cervelo didn't make me signficantly faster, but it is a lot smoother ride on rough road around here. I'll have this bike for a long time.

It seems like you need to spend more on road bikes to get the same quality components as mountain bikes.

It's nice to be able to just hop on the road bike and put in some quick miles. I actually ride it more than mountain because of the convenience. :lol:

Good luck and hopefully that helps.
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Re: looking for a road bike.

Postby bikerector » June 10th, 2013, 8:33 pm

Having owned most of the levels of most of the main component manufacturers, all of the components work just fine, even the low end stuff. My first road bike was an aluminum cyclocross bike with shimano sora and 2200 (bottom end) and it lasted 2 years and several thousand miles of traveling before I sold the stuff off to try a different style of shifting. The components lasted longer than the 2 frames that I broke while the parts were on it including 2 winters of riding. Point being, you don't need to spend a crap load of money to ride road, especially if you don't think you'll be doing thousands of miles of riding which is about the only time you'll start noticing if the higher end components last longer. Shimano tiagra works well and so does shimano sora.

Needing to start with 105 or better is for the birds, in my opinion. It only applies if you plan to race and/or get hardcore about road riding. Filling in mtb rides with a road ride doesn't give the impression that you'll be doing 50 mile road rides several times a week. I raced with shimano sora with thumb shifters my first year of cyclocross and no one I beat knew I was riding low end but me.

Don't worry about grams, it just costs money to be lighter and if you're not racing it's not that big of a deal. Best advice is to get a cheaper bike and get better wheels, you'll notice that before you will a drivetrain upgrade.

Getting something under $1000 new should be very easy, shouldn't even have to shop around much to find it. You're most likely limited to aluminum frames at that pricepoint but there are some decent steel offerings at those price points, like those offered by jamis.

Test riding is the best option, you should find out pretty quick what the difference between pricepoints are, assuming the bike shop did their job to make sure the bike is in god working order (not all do). Skipping gears and poor shifting from new components is not a bikes fault, it wasn't set up right if that's the case.

I think sram apex or rival are the best performance per dollar component groups but they often are saved for more expensive bikes builds, shimano 105 following closely behind. Many people who ride road "lightly" will be well served with tiagra and or sora, especially if you can get some of the older 8 or 9 speed setups (10 speed is much more expensive to maintain in terms of replacing chains and cassettes).

Campy is cool stuff too but it doesn't come stock on anything and it's pretty much always more expensive to build up a bike to get something already built. The lowest end campagnolo is still good stuff, they pretty much just don't have low end stuff, kind of like sram, though apex and rival are priced towards low end but function similar to the high end sram.

Used is a good option to start out, you can get better components for less money. There should be a lot of bikes going n sale as 2014 models should be on their way in soon. Consider cyclocross bikes as well, not just road. They're fairly similar and more versatile since they can take wider tires.
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